Top Questions to Ask Your Motorcycle Accident Lawyer

Top Questions to Ask Your Motorcycle Accident Lawyer

Whether you are the victim of a motorcycle accident or have witnessed one, you should consult with a skilled legal professional. You should be aware of the Statute of Limitations, Compensation, Pain and Suffering damages, and the Comparative Negligence Doctrine. Here are some of the top questions to ask your attorney. Moreover, you should be aware of the benefits of retaining a lawyer.

Compensation

If you’ve been in a motorcycle accident, you may be wondering whether you can file a lawsuit. While the law gives you a limited amount of time to file a lawsuit, you need to act fast if you want to get the compensation you deserve. Additionally, motorcycle accident injuries often require extensive medical treatment and recovery periods, which make it hard to focus on filing a legal claim while you’re recovering. In order to avoid delays in filing your lawsuit, Massey & Associates will answer all of your questions, ensure your suit is filed on time, and handle your case while you’re recovering.

Statute of limitations

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, you may be wondering about the statute of limitations for filing a claim. This time frame can be complicated and should be discussed with your attorney before filing any lawsuit. Most personal injury claims have a two-year statute of limitations, starting on the date of the accident. However, if you are under the age of twenty, you have only two years to file a claim.

Pain and suffering damages

If you have suffered pain and suffering due to a motorcycle accident, you may qualify for compensation. An attorney who specializes in this area of the law can help you get the compensation you need. The firm has represented individuals in Chattanooga for over 20 years and focuses on personal injury law. They can also help you during settlement negotiations. Attorneys Herbert Thornbury and James Kenmar are board certified trial specialists.

Comparative negligence doctrine

While the Tennessee Supreme Court has largely abandoned contributory negligence, the doctrine of comparative negligence is still in place in some circumstances. In this scenario, the defendant is partially at fault but cannot avoid paying damages due to his or her negligence. In Tennessee, however, a victim who is more than 49 percent at fault may not be entitled to recover any economic damages at all. If the defendant denies any fault, they may still be entitled to receive compensation for their injuries.

Insurance companies’ tactics in motorcycle accident cases

If you’ve been involved in a motorcycle accident and have been unable to obtain compensation from the other party, the insurance company’s tactics will make your case even more difficult. These tactics include accusing motorcycle riders of being at fault, and delaying the claims process by saying that they don’t have all the information they need to prove negligence. The insurance adjuster will also play into motorcycle bias, or the perception that motorcyclists are more likely to be at fault than drivers.

error: Content is protected !!